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Abdullah Siddiqui – Pakistan’s Rising EDM Star

Lahore-born Abdullah Siddiqui has been touted as the future of the Pakistani music scene and is introducing the country to Electronic Dance Music (EDM).

At just 18 years old, a lot of people are expecting him to make it big. The sound of his voice is a fresh touch to modern day music.

His track ‘Resistance’ was released in August 2018 and it got him recognised. The song had a foreign feel to it and it went viral on social media.

Siddiqui’s song featured on Pakistani music show Nescafé Basement on March 16, 2019. The song was viewed more than 2.4 million times in just three days.

Despite the song gaining immense popularity in Pakistan and in other countries, ‘Resistance’ was not one which took a lot of time.

Siddiqui said: “I wrote and recorded the song in three days. I was really unwell and it just kind of resonated in the lyrics.

“I tend to write songs that might describe my state of mind. I don’t really rationalise it. But once I read what I’ve written again, it all makes sense to me.”

Siddiqui has always enjoyed music growing up and spoke about the genres he works with.

“I work mostly with Electronic and Indie Pop genres.

“My maternal side has always been into music. No family event would be complete without it. So, I’ve always been around music and grew up with it.”

Siddiqui’s musical style of EDM and Indie Pop is a fresh approach to the electronic music scene that exists in Pakistan but is not fully appreciated.

While EDM is very popular across the world, cities in Pakistan have not experienced the full potential of such a lively genre.

On why the chose Resistance since it was already on mainstream media, Siddiqui shared it was because Xulfi liked the song for what it was.

“Xulfi didn’t want to change it all. He liked the song for what it was. He just thought Resistance didn’t have enough audience. He had a very clear idea on how he wanted to do it. He wanted the soul of the song to remain the same. Had I had complete control on the changes, I wouldn’t have done it any differently,” he said.

Does Siddiqui see himself taking music up as a full-fledged profession? “I plan on making music while getting a degree and continuing my studies. I hope – in the not so distant future – I see myself become a full-time musician,” he continues. “In five years, I see myself doing everything. I’m into film-making and I’m into writing.”

He concluded, “Remember when I said I like to experiment? Well, that’s not just limited to music.”

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